twofacedsheep:

Leucistic Turkey Vulture.
Photo by Cheryl Matthews

twofacedsheep:

Leucistic Turkey Vulture.

Photo by Cheryl Matthews

featheroftheowl:

Western Screech Owls by peterjthiemann

featheroftheowl:

Western Screech Owls by peterjthiemann

mpreg-tony:

kate-wisehart:

narwhalslaughingalonewithscience:

becausebirds:

How my Red-tailed Hawk says hello. x

Fun fact: red-tailed hawk calls often replace bald eagle calls in movies and the like. Probably because the bald eagle actually sounds like this

Oh my god that eagle in the second link oh my god

Hawk: Majestic screeching
Eagle: Adorable chirping

featheroftheowl:

Galapagos Short-eared Owl by Dave 2x

featheroftheowl:

Galapagos Short-eared Owl by Dave 2x

mymodernmet:

24-year-old photographer Asher Svidensky recently traveled to west Mongolia with the intention of documenting the lives of traditional Kazakh eagle hunters, people who tame eagles for the purpose of hunting smaller animals.

With the traditions typically laying in the hands of the boys and the men, the biggest surprise throughout the journey was Svidensky’s discovery of a young eagle huntress, 13-year-old Ashol Pan, the daughter of an experienced eagle hunter. These stunning photographs symbolize the potential future of the eagle hunting tradition as it expands beyond a male-only practice.

huntersonthewing:

Yellow headed caracaras, Milvago chimachima, are one of several species of caracara. They are often seen in the wild alongside larger animals, for example like the tapir above, or other mammals such as capybara or cattle. The reason for this is because they have mutually beneficial relationship; the caracaras will eat ticks and other parasites on the larger species, therefore gaining easy meals as the mammals earn free parasite removal.

They species shares the Family Falconidae with kestrels, hobbys and falcons, although they are very visually different to their Family counterparts. Caracaras do not have the sleek, fast flying abilities like falcons, rather they seem visually closer to larger, slow flying raptors such as common buzzards. This means they will generally scavenge rather than actively hunt.

As with many raptors, there is no noticeable sexual dimorphism with the exception of a size difference; the females are generally larger.

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